6 Healthy Foods that Are Making You Fat

What happened when 10,000 dieters ate mainly healthy foods? Not much, if they filled up on the foods from this list. Here’s how to eat right and lose weight.

1. FAT FOOD TRAP: Bread
Bread-lovers in the study discovered that it was easy to eat too much of that food in a single sitting. If you can’t live without sandwiches, then you should have them, but try to splurge on only those couple of slices of bread a day. Bread isn’t evil; it just tends to be hard to control for people who love it.

WHAT TO EAT INSTEAD: Grains
Slice your protein or veggies over grains including whole-wheat pasta, wild rice, couscous, or quinoa.

2. FAT FOOD TRAP: Fruit-flavored yogurt
When Weight Watchers asked 10,000 dieters to eat wholesome foods – like grains, vegetables, dairy, and lean protein – they saw that people often ate four containers of low-fat yogurt a day if the fruit was mixed in. But if the subjects had to stir in the fruit themselves, they stopped at only one cup.

WHAT TO EAT INSTEAD: Plain, nonfat yogurt – you add fresh fruit
Mixing in fruit yourself is enough to prevent you from mindless overeating, says Karen Miller-Kovach, R.D., chief scientific officer for Weight Watchers International and head of the healthy-eating program.

3. FAT FOOD TRAP: Breakfast cereal – even the healthy kind
The same Weight Watchers study also showed that people who ate cereal right out of the box as a snack tended to munch on way too much of it in a day. Even healthy, high-fiber cereals can up the day’s calorie count and halt people’s weight loss.

WHAT TO EAT INSTEAD: Eat cereal only with milk
This combination also decreases the meal’s “calorie density” – an ounce of cereal with milk (skim, of course) has fewer calories than an ounce of cereal alone, so you’ll take in fewer calories but still feel just as satisfied.

4. FAT FOOD TRAP: White rice

It takes more white rice than brown to make you feel just as satisfied. That’s because white rice contains no fiber – a food component that helps you feel full. White pasta also tends to be fiber-free and less filling than whole wheat.

WHAT TO EAT INSTEAD: Brown rice
You might eat only 50 or 60 fewer calories when you make the switch to brown rice or pasta, but that can be enough to make a difference in weight loss, says Miller-Kovach.

5. FAT FOOD TRAP: 1 percent cottage cheese
At first, study participants tried incorporating low-fat, not just nonfat, products. “We don’t know whether this higher-fat cottage cheese affected weight loss because of the little bit of fat it contains, or because people ate more of it,” says Miller-Kovach.

WHAT TO EAT INSTEAD: Nonfat cottage cheese
Eating only the fat-free version allowed people in the study to continue losing extra weight.

6. FAT FOOD TRAP: Sugar-free hot chocolate
People who tried to satisfy their sweet cravings with sugar-free hot chocolate ended up drinking as many as five cups a day. “People would keep a mug on their desk and sip all day long, because they didn’t think of the cocoa as a ‘bad’ food,” says Miller-Kovach. But, of course, the calories add up.

WHAT TO EAT INSTEAD: Diet chocolate pudding
People who ate this instead of drinking cocoa stopped after a single serving, she says. “I think that people see pudding as a treat. They use it to satisfy the occasional sweet tooth, not to snack on all day.”

Courtesy of (http://ph.she.yahoo.com/blogs/healthy-living/6-healthy-foods-making-fat-223800062.html)

Boston Marathon bomber manhunt: Police nab suspect alive

BOSTON—Police have nabbed the 19-year-old suspected Boston Marathon bomber, after a day-long manhunt that completely shut down the city of Boston and several suburbs and left one police officer dead. Bostonians flooded into the streets to cheer the news, celebrating an end to five days of fear since the bombs wounded more than 175 people and killed three.

An ambulance arrived at the scene to take the wounded suspect, Dzhokhar A. Tsarnaev, to a hospital.

Tsarnaev was found in a boat in the yard of a home on Franklin Street, close to where he and his older brother engaged in a shootout with police nearly 24 hours earlier. The homeowner discovered Tsarnaev when he saw blood on the outside of his boat and then lifted the tarp to find a person, covered in blood, inside. Police exchanged gun fire with the suspect for the next hour, before he was apprehended.

Watertown residents–finally able to leave their homes around 8:45 p.m.–broke into cheers and applauded police officers after word spread that the suspect was in custody.

“We’re so grateful to bring justice and closure to this case,” Massachusetts State Police Col. Timothy Alben said at a 9:30 p.m. press conference. “We’re exhausted … but we have a victory here tonight.” Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis said he could find no explanation for the “savagery” of the attacks.

Just a few hours earlier, at 6:00 p.m., police announced that the 19-year-old suspected bomber had so far eluded capture after fleeing from police on foot early Friday morning.

Thousands of law enforcement officers conducted a nearly 24-hour door-to-door manhunt for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, who is believed to have helped his brother plant two bombs near the finish line at Monday’s Boston Marathon that wounded more than 170 people and left three dead.

Officials announced at 6:00 p.m. news conference that they had been unable to apprehend the suspect, despite combing through a 20-block area of the Boston suburb of Watertown and shutting down the city’s entire public transportation system in an effort to prevent him from fleeing. They said they did not know if he had a car, or if he was still on foot.

Gov. Deval Patrick lifted his previous “shelter in place,” or lockdown, order for the city of Boston and many surrounding areas of the city at 6:00 p.m.. But Patrick urged Bostonians to continue to be “vigilant” as the “very dangerous” armed suspect has not been apprehended.

An overnight police chase and shootout left Dzhokhar’s 26-year-old brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev dead and Dzhokhar on the lam.

Federal investigators had released photos and videos of the two men hours earlier, showing them in the vicinity of the marathon finish line before the twin explosions. Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was seen placing a backpack on the ground minutes before the blast, investigators said.

One police officer was killed and another seriously wounded during the violent spree. The city of Boston and its surrounding areas ground to a standstill for hours as police went door to door searching for the suspect in the suburb of Watertown.

Police said they had uncovered several improvised explosive devices (IEDs) in Watertown and in the brothers’ home in Cambridge.

Tsarnaev is a student at the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth. The Tsarnaev family is originally from Chechnya, a volatile and once war-torn southern Russian republic. The family fled to Kyrgyzstan and eventually immigrated to the United States as refugees about 10 years ago.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev, the dead suspect, studied at a local community college and was a Golden Gloves boxer. He also reportedly had a wife and young child. The FBI questioned him two years ago for terrorist ties at the request of a foreign government, but cleared him, according to the AP.

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, who was remembered by former classmates as bright and personable, posted links to pro-Chechnyan independence sites on his social media page, and listed his world view as “Islam.” It’s unknown if either the separatist politics of Chechnya or their religion had anything to do with the suspects’ motivations.

Tsarnaev appeared to be posting to his Twitter account even after the marathon attacks, writing in his last post on Wednesday, “I’m a stress free kind of guy.” His posts covered everything from cute photos of his cat to rap lyrics.

In an interview with The New York Times, the suspects’ father said Tamerlan had been unable to become a U.S. citizen because he was arrested for hitting his girlfriend, and that he traveled to Russia last year to live for six months and renew his passport. Dzhokhar is a naturalized U.S. citizen.

The suspects’ uncle, when told that one of his nephews was killed by the local CBS News station, replied that he deserved it.

“He deserved his. He absolutely deserved his,” Ruslan Tsarni said. “They do not deserve to live on this earth.”

Later, in an emotional press conference outside his home in Maryland, Tsarni said his nephews had brought shame upon his family, and called them “losers.” He speculated that they were not “able to settle themselves” and were “angry at everyone who was able to.” He said he did not believe they were motivated by radical politics in Chechnya or their Muslim religion.

“Dzhokhar, If you’re alive, turn yourself in and ask for forgiveness from the victims [and] the injured,” he said. “He put a shame on our family. He put a shame on the entire Chechnyan ethnicity. Turn yourself in.”

He added that he hadn’t been in touch with the family for several years but would not say why.

“I’m ready to kneel in front of them and ask their forgiveness,” Tsarni said of the victims of his nephews’ crime. “I respect this country; I love this country … this country that gives everybody chance to be treated like human being.” Other family members, including an aunt and the brothers’ father, said they did not believe the brothers could have planted bombs.

The University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth announced shortly after 10:30 a.m. on Friday that they were evacuating the entire campus after learning Tsarnaev is a registered student there.

Earlier, at sunrise Friday, Gov. Patrick ordered a shutdown of all public transit and for residents in the city of Boston and on its edges to stay indoors. Amtrak also shut down all trains between Boston and New York.

“We cannot continue to lock down an entire city or an entire state,” Alben told reporters. He added that he believes the suspect is still in the state, but would not elaborate.

Boston and the surrounding areas of Watertown, Waltham, Belmont, Cambridge, Newton, Allston and Brighton were placed on lockdown for most of Friday. A no-fly zone was declared over Watertown. The city of Boston was eerily quiet for much of the day, the city’s busy intersections totally abandoned.

The mayhem began at approximately 10:20 p.m. Thursday in Cambridge when police said the bombing suspects shot and killed an MIT campus officer, Sean Collier, 26. Davis said that Collier was “assassinated” by the suspects while sitting in his cruiser. The terror suspects then carjacked a Mercedes-Benz SUV with the driver inside and fled, eventually letting the driver go unharmed.

The suspects were then spotted in Watertown, where federal agents swarmed in. At approximately 3:30 a.m., Massachusetts State

Police issued a plea on Twitter for residents of Watertown to lock their doors and not open them for anyone, as dozens of police officers, many of them off duty, searched backyards and exteriors of houses there, and a police perimeter of several blocks was established.

Worried residents were also told to turn off their cell phones out of fear that they could trigger improvised explosive devices.

The suspects exchanged dozens of rounds of gunfire with patrol officers, and lobbed IEDs out of their vehicle, injuring several officers.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev was shot by police and brought to Beth Israel Medical Center. He arrived at the hospital under cardiac arrest with multiple gunshot wounds and blast-like injuries to his chest. The second suspect fled on foot.

A transit police officer, Richard H. Donohue, was seriously wounded during the exchange of gunfire, officials said.

K9 units and SWAT teams searched homes on Spruce Street as officers with a police robot searched an SUV that the suspects had abandoned. Multiple devices were left in the road and two handguns were recovered, according to police scanners.

“We believe this to be a terrorist,” said Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis, of Tsarnaev. “We believe this to be a man who has come here to kill people. We need to get him into custody.”

Police in Watertown, Newton, Brighton and Cambridge were put on high alert. “Units use caution,” an officer said. “He might have an explosive object on his person.”


Police were able to track down images of the suspects after a victim of the attacks, Jeff Bauman, came to them with a description, Bloomberg reported Thursday. Bauman’s legs were torn apart by the bomb.

At least three dead, 130 injured after bombs explode at Boston Marathon

At least 130 people are injured and three dead after two bombs exploded near the finish line of the Boston Marathon Monday afternoon. The injuries include dismemberment, witnesses said, and local hospitals say they are treating shrapnel wounds, open fractures and limb injuries. An eight-year-old boy is one of the three known dead, multiple news outlets reported, and several of the injured are also children.

At a Monday night press conference, Gov. Deval Patrick urged Bostonians to be vigilant on their morning commute Tuesday, and to report any suspicious packages to the police. The FBI has officially taken over the investigation, and is treating it as a potential terrorist attack.

Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis stressed that the police had no suspect in custody yet. “I’m not prepared to say we are at ease at this time,” Davis said, when asked if the area was safe. Authoritiesfound and dismantled five more more explosive devices in the area, according to The Wall Street Journal.

“This cowardly act will not be taken in stride,” Davis said. “We will turn over every rock to find out who is responsible.”

Davis said Boston police were not aware of any specific threat to the marathon before it began. Police said they had no one in custody and no suspects, but the Boston Globe reported that a “person of interest” who was injured in the blast was being questioned at Brigham and Woman’s HospitalMonday night.

Two large explosions, just 50 yards apart, went off at 2:50 p.m. ET, more than four hours into the race. One of the explosions happened near the entrance of the Fairmont Copley Hotel in Copley Square. The blast scattered hundreds of onlookers and runners, and left a bloody scene of injured spectators, including children. Local news reporter Jackie Bruno wrote that she saw some people with their limbs blown off. The Boston Police Department said it is looking for video footage taken from the finish line as part of its investigation. Video footage shows first responders and bystanders rushing to the scene of the blast to help the wounded.

Boston Medical Center took in 20 patients, including two children, most of whom are being treated for “lower leg injuries,” a spokeswoman said. A spokeswoman for Tufts Medical Center said the hospital is treating nine patients for conditions such as shrapnel wounds, ruptured ear drums, and “serious orthopedic and neuromuscular trauma to the lower legs.” At least one patient was as young as three years old.

President Barack Obama warned Americans in a brief statement Monday evening not to jump to conclusions before authorities find out who committed the crime. “We will find out who did this,” Obama said in an appearance in the White House briefing room. “Any responsible individuals, any responsible groups will feel the full weight of justice.” A White House official said the incident is being treated as an act of terror.

NBC News, citing anonymous law enforcement sources, reported Monday that a “small homemade bomb” is believed to be responsible for the explosion. The FAA created a no-fly zone around the area. Cell phone service was shut down in the area, the AP reported, to prevent any remote detonations. Family and friends of marathon runners or spectators can call 617-635-4500 for information on their loved ones.

This video from the Boston Globe shows the moment the bomb went off, and the paper has also pulled together dramatic photos from the aftermath. According to marathon officials, several thousand runners had not finished the race when the explosions detonated.

Police have evacuated the area on Boylston Street to continue sweeping for more devices. Runners who had not yet finished the race were stopped at mile 25 and directed to Boston Common. The Boston Police Department called in all off duty officers in the city. This New York Times map shows where on the route the explosions took place.

Patrick called it a “horrific day in Boston” in a statement.

The New York Police Department is stepping up security around the city in response to the explosion. At the White House, yellow police tape was used to block off Pennsylvania Avenue from pedestrians in front of the White House’s north gates and secret service were positioned along the perimeter. Credentialed pass holders continued to be permitted entry and exit from both the White House and the Executive Office Building.

Credits to (http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/lookout/dozens-people-injured-explosion-boston-marathon-190955311.html)

If North Korea Nukes Are Fired, Alaska’s Fort Greely Is Last Line of Defense

If North Korea Nukes Are Fired, Alaska's Fort Greely Is Last Line of Defense (ABC News)

In the remote Alaska wilderness, some 3,800 miles from Pyongyang, North Korea, the United States’ last line of defense against a nuclear warhead from North Korea or Iran stands ready to attack.

Fort Greely, Alaska, a World War II-era Army base that was reopened in 2004, is America’s last chance to shoot down a missile from overseas that could be carrying a nuclear weapon. Its underground steel and concrete silos house 26 missile interceptors that have, in tests, a 50 percent success rate.

The 800-acre base is located some 100 miles southeast of Fairbanks, in the looming shadow of Denali. It is one of only two missile defense complexes in the country. The other, Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, houses four interceptors that are used for testing and “backup,” according to defense officials.

In March, as the North Korean crisis began to heat up, President Obama ordered another 14 interceptors be sent to Greely, bringing its arsenal to 44 from 2017.

Concern about North Korea heightened this week when the Defense Intelligence Agency released a document that concluded with “moderate confidence” that North Korea might have a nuclear weapon that’s small enough to be placed on a ballistic missile. But the agency also said the reliability of a North Korean missile would be low.

Greely is equipped to handle the current threat, which is seen as slight, according to Leon Sigal, an expert on North Korea at the Social Science Research Council in New York.

“If all it has to worry about is a single missile coming at it, chance it could kill it. If you fire six missiles at one time… and if one gets through, your whole day is ruined…. The problem is sooner or later North Korea will improve its missile ranges, so the question you have to ask is will our anti-missile capabilities make sufficient progress so it could work against a more robust threat?” Sigal said.

“What we’ve got at Greely is of some limited utility. It’s better than nothing,” he said.

The U.S. military, however, confident that Greely is poised to swat away any missile threat.

“Basically central Alaska was an ideal spot because of the geometry you’d have to conduct a hit-to-kill intercept from a country like Iran or North Korea,” said Ralph Scott, spokesman for the Missile Defense Agency in Alaska.

“Alaska is like the top of the world, and the only way you can view it as a missile defense benefit would be to look at a globe. You can see the routes the missiles from North Korea and Iran would take to get to the U.S. Having the system there in central Alaska would give you that geometry,” Scott said.

The base at Fort Greely is desolate and spare, with one highway that rolls into and out of the base connecting it to a rugged Alaskan landscape. As the base’s spokeswoman, Deborah Coble, pointed out, the nearest stoplight is 100 miles away.

The base was used in the years after World War II to train soldiers in cold climate-warfare. Soldiers now stationed at the base still test cold-weather uniforms, layered with synthetic and engineered fibers, for the Army.

“Travel to areas with standard day-to-day services can be treacherous,” Coble said. “Temperatures can reach from 60 below zero and colder in winter to the high 80s to low 90s in summer. Winds can reach over 80 (miles per hour). Fort Greely is truly the ‘Home of the Rugged Professional.’

Today, Fort Greely’s sole purpose is missile defense, and its only occupants are staff to operate and maintain the missiles, their software, and the base’s operations. The population is usually about 1,450 people. Most are contractors charged with maintaining the technology, and base support staff. The crew includes only 40 active duty Army troops and 160 members of the National Guard’s 49th Missile Defense Battalion.

The interceptor silos are spread across two missile fields on the base. In the event of a missile launched from the other side of the world, clam shell-like doors at the top of the silos would shoot open and the interceptor would rocket more than 100 miles into the sky at speeds of 18,000 miles per hour, according to Scott.

When the 54-foot-long interceptors reach the right altitude, the interceptors launch the attached 140-pound “kill vehicle” at the warhead, Scott explained. The two collide, taking down the nuclear warhead.

“There are no explosives. It’s all done by kinetic energy,” he explained.

“It’s hit-to-kill technology,” said Rick Lehner of the U.S. Missile Defense Agency. “What it does is, you’re colliding the kill vehicle directly with the warhead, and just the sheer force of the collision happens very high in space.”

Tests of the technology, however, have shown problems with the interceptors and their effectiveness in taking down another missile. While the Alaska interceptors have never been tested, the ones at Vandenberg have been tested with about a 50 percent success rate.

“We’ve had 15 tests, and eight have had successful intercepts. Seven did not, but of those seven only three were actual misses and the other four came from problems with quality control or software issues,” Lehner said.

“Based upon what we learn from the failures, we’ve incorporated fixes into the silos in Alaska and California,” he said. “We have very, very high confidence in their ability to perform.”

Congress has also asked the Defense Department to look into placing a missile defense system on the East Coast, though Lehner insisted that the Alaska base would be able to protect the entire country from a missile attack.

As rhetoric from North Korea has grown more belligerent in recent weeks, missile defense systems around the world are prepared for any kind of launch, according to the Department of Defense. That includes defenses against short- and mid-range missiles aboard battle ships in the Pacific as well as radar and ground systems in Japan and Guam.

But the interceptors at Fort Greely are specifically designed for long range missiles, known as an Intercontinental Ballistic Missile or ICBM, currently in development in North Korea and Iran.

The Defense Department believes that North Korea was testing one such ICBM when it launched a rocket in December that North Korea press described as a space launch.

“We believe they’re testing their ICBM,” said Lt. Col. Cathy Wilkinson of the Secretary of Defense’s office. “That’s why the international community objected to the December launch.”

If North Korea developed the ability to launch a nuclear warhead on an ICBM, the interceptors would need to be ready, the Defense Department said.

The time between a missile being launched to the interceptors needing to be fired would be “minutes,” Scott said.

“We know that they have an ICBM program, and we know that they are pursuing a nuclear program,” Wilkinson said.

Credits to (http://news.yahoo.com/north-korea-nukes-fired-alaskas-fort-greely-last-232119926–abc-news-topstories.html)

Farmers, fishermen still PH’s lowest paid, says study

Even if they produce the food we eat, agriculture workers remain the poorest in the Philippines, the Statistics chief said, as he noted the need for improved policy support and investments in the sector.

Poverty incidence is highest among fishermen and farmers at 41.4 percent and 36.7 percent respectively in 2009, National Statistical Coordination Board Secretary-General Jose Ramon Albert said Friday.

This is “way above” the poverty incidence for the entire Philippines pegged at 26.5 percent in the same year, Albert said in his “Beyond the Numbers” post in the NSCB website.

This is not surprising, Albert said, as he noted that farmers and fishermen are among the economy’s least paid workers and also post the lowest labor productivity rate.

Farmers were only paid an average of P156.8 a day in 2011 while fishermen took home P178.43 daily, rates the statistics chief compared to those of Pinoy “kasambahays.”

The entire agriculture sector, meanwhile, posted the lowest labor productivity rate of only P56,728 in 2012, way below the industry and services sectors’ rates of P351,024 and P181,850 respectively.

Labor productivity is measured as the ratio of the sector’s gross value added–or its contribution to the national economy–to the total number of employed persons.

Agriculture’s importance to the economy has dwindled over the years to only 11.1 percent in 2012 from 29.7 percent in 1946, Albert said.

He noted, however, that the sector has comprised about a third of the country’s total employment for the past two decades.

“[T]he Philippines continues to face a lot of challenges particularly to uplift the farmers out of poverty,” Albert said, despite resources devoted to the sector by past and present administrations.

The Statistics chief however urged critics to be wary in using current data to slam the government’s efforts to improve agriculture, noting that “even when policy interventions are made, the effects take time.”

He also urged private sector and civil society involvement in the agriculture sector by reducing transportation costs and the profits of middle-men.

“Many efforts have not yielded fruit, but perhaps, it is time also for everyone to recognize that we can’t leave everything to government,” Albert said.

Credits to (http://ph.news.yahoo.com/farmers–fishermen-still-ph-s-lowest-paid–says-study-081227172.html)